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February 06, 2012

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A powerful post. Thank you for writing this, Whitney. It's an important notion that every entrepreneur who is trying to change the world can use to strengthen their own product offering.

I suppose that makes this post another positive outcome of the fact that Ms. Sandberg isn't on the board...yet.

Brava, Whitney, for a powerful and important piece.

Where some may have taken on a shrill tone, you instead get down to the brass tacks of what lasting, meaningful change requires.

We don't need a token or a figurehead. We need sustainable, equitable representation in the governing bodies that control how we communicate, think and conduct business. And we are very, very far from that.

Thank you for reminding us, so eloquently.

Great post, and I completely agree that Sheryl S has done wonderful work on gender equality.
But I want to encourage her to use her incredibly strong position to push hard on the "board" issue -- imagine what it would do for gender diversity work if she would actually quit over this!
My thoughts are here: Why Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg must resign!
http://bit.ly/zdfcPC

Amen. Thank you for the very eloquent, moving post (as always!).

Fascinating to watch history in the moment - note that if the IPO evaluation holds, she will wind up a billionaire...

Which caused me to ask: would I be willing to forgo a board seat if I could make $1.6B?

Hmmm...

Brilliant post Whitney!

Powerful post. I had not heard the Dalai Lama quote.

Thanks Whitney!

Very much agree that our important contributions come during "blustery, sleet-filled winters." So, how do we make important contributions during the sunshine times?

Well written and I fully agree. Carrying and having lived the other aspect of inequity, I always believe that staying on your path and being true to yourself is the best approach and patience and persistence are qualities that have great value in dealing with this. That is the way that's constructive in allowing one to always move forward. I will look for Sheryl TED Talk as I am not aware of it. "The more things change, the more they stay the same"

Love this post, Whitney. And thank you for the links. On the idea that good work emerges from difficulty, I like this Rob Bell piece from CNN's Belief Blog. http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2011/02/13/my-faith-suffering-my-way-to-a-new-tomorrow/

Here's my favorite bit:

"Suffering, it turns out, demands profound imagination. A new future has to be conjured up because the old future isn't there anymore."

I am not sure that Sheryl Sandberg is suffering, but surely pained.

In the past I have written about my disappointment with Sheryl Sandberg's not being on Facebook's board. Your post helped me see the proverbial silver lining hidden in that dark cloud. And- it highlights how you can look at a situation and see the opportunity that could easily be missed. Thank you!

Thanks Whitney for links and perspective. At end of day wouldn't Sandberg prefer chair at table than billion?

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About this blog

  • When I took a sabbatical from Wall Street to pursue a different dream and help others live theirs, I learned that women in the U.S. may be placated, even pampered, but because we aren't dreaming, we are also desperate and depressed. Drawing on a variety of sources, ranging from academic studies to pop culture, dare to dream encourages us to dream. And then to act on our dreams.

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